I recently broke up with Canada!

I recently broke up with Canada.  While breaking up with a country sounds awfully dramatic, this really is not.  My wife and many of her friends are from Canada and when the country showed up under “people you may know” on Facebook, I didn’t think twice about friending Canada.  I’ve had great experiences with all my Canadian friends and the multiple business trips and vacations up north have all been enjoyable.  I figured there would be no harm in showing my support for the Maple Leaf.  Instead, I was immediately inundated with posts, notes and articles about Canada.  With so many posts about Canada in my news feed, I found it challenging to keep up with my actual friends.  While some of the articles were interesting, the overexposure quickly moved Canada to my ignore list.

There is a fine line between presenting a lot of useful information and spam.  We tend to associate spam with the flood of requests in an inbox to help with international banking transactions or to purchase questionable medications online.  In reality, spam can be any type of bulk communication sent electronically.  I am sure the marketing folks managing the Canada Facebook page did not see their communication as spam, but I saw it that way when its’ posts took up a third of my news feed.

For a small business looking to increase sales or leads through Web 2.0 marketing, desensitizing your audience through too much information can really hinder your efforts.  Here are a few basic communication tips to help with your online campaign:

1. Aggregate your information – Small businesses should communicate daily or weekly to stay in the minds of their customers, but you should not inundate them with information.  If you have multiple newsworthy items in one day, consolidate them into a few emails, forum posts, or Facebook notes.

2. Relate to your audience – Simply posting a link to an article does not make it inherently interesting.  Make sure you explain why the article is useful for your audience and how it relates to your business.

3. Understand the medium – Twitter and Facebook are integrated and blog posts can be easily shared with multiple information aggregators.  That does not mean people use Twitter, Facebook and blogs for the same purpose.  While content can be shared, it is important to understand how your users interface with each application and be flexible in each marketing approach.

4. Read the feedback – Possibly the most useful function of Web 2.0 technologies is the ability to receive instant feedback.  This is incredibly helpful for any company to evaluate the effectiveness of a marketing campaign beyond sales numbers.  Instantaneous feedback allows you to change your business strategies on the fly and tailor your message to the people you most want to reach.

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One Response to “I recently broke up with Canada!”

  1. Christa says:

    Hey Joel – I like your blog… it’s so true – I have several fan sites and 1 actual friend in my ignore list on FB – way TMI! I was just up in the Canadian Rockies on vacation – what beautiful country!!

    I hope you’re doing well – sounds like you are since you’re working and mention your wife (Fiona I’m assuming?). Take care! Christa

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