Let Me Tweet This PowerPoint To You On Facebook

I’ve been advised not to tweet about Twitter.  I get annoyed at invites to join Facebook groups about Facebook.  I understand the retribution if you Fark your own link.  But PowerPoint presentations about PowerPoint?  Hilarious!  You might be asking yourself right now, what the heck does PowerPoint have to do with various social media outlets?  With the advent of useful tools like Webex and GotoMeeting, PowerPoint can have the same immediate effects of Social Media tools when used correctly.  A good PowerPoint presentation can enhance your marketing arguments and call your audience to action.  However, the only action most .PPT presentations call us to is the desire for a solid afternoon nap.

As a former public speaking instructor, and someone who has had the pleasure of sitting through hundreds of “white paper” style marketing PowerPoints from one of the world’s largest and most respected Information Technology companies, I have one simple request.  Stop hurting my brain with your presentations.  PowerPoint is really a magnification tool—it can make a good presentation better, or more often, make a bad presentation worse.

All is not lost, even if you slept through my Public Communication class when you were an undergrad.  Here are a few useful tips for making your PowerPoint better:

Have a thesis.

I know this sounds like a painful school exercise, but if you can’t boil the point of your presentation down to one sentence then you aren’t ready to create it.  You will be mired in a Florida swampland of ideas and concepts with no focus for you or your audience.  This sentence should be brief and to the point.

Prepare your speech before you open PowerPoint.

Open Word, or Excel if you are a geek like me, and create an outline before you even think about touching PowerPoint.  PowerPoint’s strong suit is not helping you organize a presentation.  It’s not designed to do that.  So don’t.  If I am in your audience, I might even give you a hug for doing it.

Think about your audience

Even with my shoes and socks off, I can’t count the number of PowerPoint presentations where the speaker grabbed 5-10 canned marketing slides, 10-15 technical slides, 5 more sales slides and then added a couple of IDC surveys to some slides.  This doesn’t make sense for anyone.  Think about the people you are presenting to and meet that audience’s expectation.  You’ll find you generate more meaning than if you create one presentation and try to fit that to the audience.

If it can stand on it’s own in an email, don’t present it.

“Oh, you missed the presentation?  I’ll just forward it to you and it will make sense.”  This is bad.  BAD!  If you don’t need to present and engage your audience aloud, you’ve marginalized your usefulness.  Mailing out a PowerPoint after the fact is fine, if it’s meant to remind audience members of what you had to say.

36-24-18

36 is the header.  24 is the sub header. 18 are the points.  Shrinking the font means there is too much on the slide.  Any smaller than 18 and your audience either won’t be able to read it on a projector screen, or worse, they are reading it on their computer and not listening to you.

If you think it is nifty, it probably isn’t.

Sound effects, animated gifs and the like might seem amusing at your desk, but in presentations they come off as silly or distracting.  If I want to hear applause at the end of your presentation, I’ll clap.  Animations or sound effects also need to be properly timed and if you are violating this tip it’s likely you aren’t practicing enough to have them work for you.

Have a real outline to your presentation.

Most presenters claim they won’t read their slides, and yet they all do.  It’s like that New Year’s resolution that is broken by January 3rd.  Reading the slides is boring.  Think about all the PowerPoints you’ve been through in your life. Now think of how many of them were dull because the presenter read, then examine how many times you’ve read a PPT to others.

Have an introduction and conclusion.

“My presentation is about” is not compelling.  Really it’s not.  Seriously.  I am not joking.  Find a way to relate to your audience and get them interested in what they have to say.  The wife once began a presentation with, “I tried to find something funny about this topic to start my presentation, but honestly there’s nothing funny about it at all.”  You know what?  Everyone laughed at her joke, the audience perked up and she relaxed.  All with a silly little joke.  It’s amazing how much a little effort to connect with the audience can go a long way to improving a presentation.  The conclusion gives a final chance to remind the audience of what they need to do, to really drive home your thesis (did you notice what I did just there?).

We are not going to have better PowerPoint presentations overnight.  However, a few simple things can go a long way to create better communication between you and your audience and improve your chances of getting your message across, and not just making them wish for cookies, milk and a blue mat on the floor.

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One Response to “Let Me Tweet This PowerPoint To You On Facebook”

  1. [...] 2009, I wrote about some basic suggestions for giving better presentations, but I think it might be time to revisit this since nearly every [...]

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