Take My Wife Money. Please!

It’s a simple premise. You are doing something good and I want to give you money or time to help your cause. Make it easy for me to do so. Since the Wife and I can’t afford to be professional philanthropists, we donate time or money when we can to help worthwhile causes. We’ve found several in the last year that we wanted to help, but our offers seemed to have fallen into the giant black hole of the internet.

I talk quite a bit about finding customers on this blog, but I haven’t spent much time discussing what to do when you find them. Getting the worm on the hook is actually the hard part. Don’t stare blankly at the fish when you get it out of the water.

At Christmas time every year, one of the Twin Cities emergency response groups takes underprivileged children to the local Target stores for some holiday shopping and cheer. The Wife and I believe this is a good cause for two reasons. First, it helps children that might not have a holiday to experience the joys of giving. Second, it gets those workers into the community and interacting with their constituents in a positive situation. Community interaction and good PR can’t hurt any group in their position.

Two years ago we donated directly to the fund, when we were at Target. It was easy to hand over some money and get our names added to their mailing list with the thought that we could annually contribute to these activities. Next holiday season no mailing came to us. There was no information on the web about it. We still wanted to help, so I did the next best thing. I sent an email to their general inquiry email address asking to be directed to an appropriate resource so I could find out more information. Since this address isn’t used to report fires or muggings, I assumed, incorrectly it turned out, that someone would take the time to help get me to where I need. I expected it might take a few days to get response, but I was sure we would get some type of reply – after all we were going to give them money. A year later I am still waiting to hear back.

Another example is a little more current. Recently, one of my favorite professors from my undergraduate institution passed away. The alumni office set up a memorial fund in his honor, and since I hadn’t really been able to donate to my college in the past, I figured this would be a good time to start. I sent a quick email on 2/11/2010 to alumni relations asking on how I could give to the memorial fund. Over two weeks later I am still waiting on a response. As most of us can agree, an Alumni office at every institution in the country is looking for more ways to increase donations, why won’t they tell me how they can take my money?

Take a quick mental inventory of your company. What procedures do you have in place to take care of general inquires? What importance do you place on your info@, sales@ or support@ email addresses? Or your feedback and contact forms? Do you get so few emails to those addresses that no one remembers to check them? Are you so focused on outbound marketing that you forget to collect the communications reaching out to you, seeking your services, your products?

When you institute an email policy for general mailboxes keep the following things in mind:
1. Are you forwarding those notes to a group of people, or are you relying on one individual to monitor those communications? If they take a vacation do they have a backup?
2. Do the individuals responding to those emails have a stake in the questions being asked? Are they willing to route communications to the appropriate resources?
3. Is the in-box so inundated with spam that legitimate requests are missed?

I could probably ask a hundred more questions, but I implore you to think about how your organization has implemented general inquiry email addresses. Taking the time to implement a smart system for inbound inquiries makes good business sense. A potential customer that declines to do business when you first reach out to them may nonetheless do business with you in the future. If you fail to respond to a potential customer, when they reach out to you – that customer is likely lost forever.

The point is simple. Any avenue of communication your potential customers or donors have to reach you is important. Let me give you my money. Seriously. All you have to do is hit reply.

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