Archive for the ‘Data Management’ Category

Your Email Address Isn’t as Private as You Think

Monday, August 13th, 2012

It’s almost football season again. Crisp fall air, bright blue skies, half-grilled/half-frozen brats, cold beer and the slow march of despair from week one to week seventeen that every Cleveland Browns fan experiences—at least this year with the training camp injuries and suspensions, we’ll get a head start on that journey. It also means a plethora of unsolicited emails from companies who scraped my email address off the Cleveland Browns’ website to offer me a myriad of NFL branded products – ranging from the useful (inflatable tailgate chairs with TWO cup holders) to the obnoxious (officially licensed vuvuzela/cowbell combo instruments for the football fan you already hate). We understand that email marketing is an effective tool to reach potential targeted customers. But we also know that a Wild West mentality toward email addresses doesn’t benefit anyone who wants to sell their product, services or even candidate when there’s a high level of competition for audience’s eyeballs.

With that thought in mind, I was extremely disappointed to come across a Minnesota Public Radio article about our state’s Data Practices Act and the lack of privacy for email addresses. The Minnesota Data Practices Act (DPA) deals specifically with access to government data and the presumption that government data is accessible to the people, much like a state level Freedom of Information Act. While I highly recommend everyone read and think about the article, the short summary is that an individual recently requested the email addresses of people from a number of cities who signed up to receive alerts about local government happenings. It revealed that based on the DPA, the information is considered public and cities are legally required to disclose the email addresses to the requestor. There’s only speculation as to why these email addresses have been requested. However, since the person asking for them is married to someone running for political office, campaigning is probably a safe assumption. But what if he wants to sell them? Or operate a very focused local phishing scam? Or in requesting all of those email addresses he is able to find the one he wants for other nefarious purposes? In this instance, I highly doubt that is the case. However, as Mat Honan discussed in Wired, it doesn’t take a whole lot of data for a pretty vicious hack to occur. If a previously undisclosed email address can be coupled with just a few other pieces of an individual’s data, a whole Pandora’s Box of private information can be opened up.

Now that I’ve gotten my scare tactics out of the way, this is really a question of state policy and its relationship to openness. One would hope our legislators would err on the side of caution when it comes to divulging people’s electronic information. That said, the reason we have the DPA is to prevent the government from hiding its doings from the public. Specifically then, legislators have chosen to exclude specific types of information as protected and then assume anything not explicitly protected is open for disclosure. That’s the rationale in this scenario, since personal email addresses aren’t excluded, they aren’t protected from DPA requests. Cities then have no choice but to comply with the DPA. So while I might wish the state would be judicious with access to personal data, there’s a very real reason the DPA supports the ability to disclose/supply more information rather than less. On one hand, it’s a question of privacy, on the other it really gets to the modern technology question of time, money, effort and accountability related to using government collected data. Let’s frame the problem this way. If I want to reach out to an entire community of people (say 5,000), there’s a cost associated with each attempt to contact every person. Be it making phone calls or the printing and postage expense to send a mail piece, there’s time, effort and money baked into each contact attempt. Email is a little different. If you are doing the deployment yourself, you have time and money spent on the software, designing the email and setting up the email list, but after that, costs drop significantly with each deployment. It’s a lot cheaper to send an email a day to a list for ninety days than it is to send a postcard daily over the same time period. It’s problematic. However, just because I want to get snow emergency notifications via email so my car isn’t towed, I don’t want to then expose my email address to any myriad of people with unknown other intentions.

While I certainly come down on the side of minimal disclosure when it comes to personal email addresses, there is some space for debate where it might be acceptable. I just can’t predict what that need might be–which is the crux of the problem where laws and policy lag behind technology.

If the courts haven’t decided if a Facebook “like” constitutes protected First Amendment speech, it’s easy to understand how complex it is to decide if signing up for snow emergency notifications or city council meeting agendas makes your email address public information. The solution isn’t simple and debate on the issue is essential to getting it right. However, in the meantime we shouldn’t just hand them out willy-nilly to anyone that asks. Unexpected benefits would be fantastic, but it hardly outweighs the inadvertent consequences that could come from disclosure.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to email a guy about the officially licensed Cleveland Browns mood rings (they are just a solid brown color designating sad resignation).

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Zombie Voters

Monday, February 27th, 2012

Don’t let November 6, 2012 be “Day of the Zombie Voter”

I read an article on Politico.com the other day which stated that there are nearly 2 million deceased people still listed on voter registration databases across the United States. Dead people voting? Come on now! We all remember the scene from “The Sixth Sense” where little Haley Joel Osment says “I see dead people”. That’s a movie, and just for our entertainment, but what if one of these people who say they can “talk to the dead” gets the word out to more of these zombies? All it’s gonna take is for James Van Praagh to start spreading the news that the dead have voting rights and we will have an epic horror show come election day!!!

Here’s an example of how this can happen: You live in Michigan where you’ve been a registered voter all of your adult life. At some point you get tired of the cold and snow, and up and move to Florida to warm your bones and eat soft, bland foods with all the other retired gray & blue hairs. You don’t vote anymore because you have a hard enough time keeping your prescriptions straight. But your long term memory is solid, and you haven’t forgotten the Florida debacle of 2000. Missing the Early Bird Special only to have your ballot thrown out due to a pregnant Chad hardly seems worth it. Eventually the day comes when you pass into the next life, or great beyond or whatever you believe happens next. BUT, since the state of Michigan hasn’t updated its database in many years, you’re still registered to vote there! (possibly along with your great-great grandfather and crazy Aunt Millie)

Thankfully, you’re still alive and kicking and not one of the “Walking Dead” from that new cult flavored television show. You have a right to vote, you pay your taxes, you probably work for a living! Dead people don’t pay taxes, and they surely should not have voting rights. Still, 953 ballots were cast in a recent election in S. Carolina by deceased voters. Apparently this was partly due to clerical error and the need to update their database. Perhaps someone submitted absentee ballots on behalf of the departed. Or did the election officials just not want to admit to seeing the zombies???

The technology to cleanse the zombies from your database is right at your fingertips. Keeping them won’t create the potential for fraud in most cases, but removing them could save you money in the long term, both in saved postage, and in saved relationships with those who were left behind. If you repeatedly mail to someone who is deceased, on some level (conscious or not), it’s likely a negative emotion may be tied to your business in the mind of the recipient of that mail.

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Someone Blogged about Direct Mail *Gasp*

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

“It just makes cents to save a few bucks.” A quick Google search tells me no one has said this before, but I find it hard to believe a pun this good has been passed up. Anyway, you don’t have to get an A in accounting to know that the two ways to increase your profit is either sell more, or spend less while generating the same revenue. It’s important to spend your sales and marketing money wisely to get the best return on your investment. Despite what you may have heard from social media or electronic marketers telling you that direct mail has little value, getting something in the mail is still a great way to reach prospects or introduce existing customers to new services. Or, if you are Delta Airlines and American Express, introduce current customers to services they already have.

Yes, I said that correctly.

It seems that about every six weeks, I get a really shiny fancy-pants offer in the mail co-signed by bigwig marketers from Delta and Amex about all the benefits of signing up for the Delta SkyMiles American Express card. It’s a great offer, provides plenty of features, and, as Rick Vaughn in Major League says, “it keeps us from getting shut out at our favorite hotels and restaurant-type places.” I’d be all for getting this card, except I already have one. It’s been nearly two years since the wife signed us up and we use the card religiously at all of those restaurant-type places.

But Joel, why don’t you just drop it in the recycling bin and be quiet about it? Because direct mail can be expensive and sending out pieces to people who already have your product doesn’t make good business sense.

For argument’s sake, let’s say that between design, printing, materials, labor, and postage that it costs about one dollar to mail each piece (maybe that’s a little high or low, but it makes the math easier). If they send out 250,000 pieces, and even if 5% are people who already have the card, they’re wasting $12,500 per mailing. If they mail eight times a year their marketing departments are spending $100,000 to reach customers that already have their product. Maybe the lifetime value of an American Express customer more than makes up for those marketing losses, but I’m guessing no company gets to that level of success by wasting $100,000 annually without trying to fix the problem.

Since my wife doesn’t get the same offers, my guess is that American Express and Delta match two files. One is the universe of people with SkyMiles numbers and the other is a file of SkyMiles numbers that are associated with an Amex card. Any records that don’t match and reach a credit score threshold get a mailer. However, this process fails to recognize joint-card accounts like my wife and I enjoy. Given the annual fee associated with this card, I’m assuming that many households similarly have joint cardholders. Given this fact, it would probably be much more effective for them to do their matching at the address level rather than at the name or SkyMiles level, which they are presently doing. Soliciting present joint-account holders is very unlikely to lead to new customers.

As with many examples, it’s easy to shrug off the “big company problem.” But if you are a small non-profit and have a correspondingly small marketing budget, you probably don’t want to waste a penny of your marketing dollars sending multiple mailers to one household. There are many ways to look at your customer list and determine the most effective way to reach the people you want, and it’s significantly cheaper to scrub your list for duplicates than it is to send them mail.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’ve gotta go call a guy about trademarking that “cents” intro.

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I already bought. I already bought.

Thursday, July 28th, 2011

A coworker sent me an article about collaboration between Google and SAP that allows SAP customers to overlay Google Earth and Google Maps information to manage “big data.” It’s a really interesting concept and if you are curious you can read about it on TechCrunch. It seems like every day we get a groovy new analytics tool or new social media platform to connect businesses with other businesses or businesses with consumers or Twitter with my cat, but a lot of organizations seem to be missing out on some of the basics when it comes to marketing. In other words, as people get new toys, organizations may appear to overlook the basic tools that helped make them successful in the first place. I have quite a number of examples, but the two below are a great illustration of how applying the most basic in-house information tools can help to reduce waste and better target your customer or donor base before using advanced analytics tools to improve your reach within a specific market.

It’s only taken us three years (a long time in married years) to finally consolidate my car insurance with my wife’s insurance. Yes, we should have done it a long time ago, but in our defense we were really busy with not doing it. Within two weeks of the new plan, I received a mailer offering to lower my rates by switching to the exact same insurance company. Although I brought it in and set it next to the refund check for my new insurance (an additional $20 discount!), it’ll be going straight into the recycling bin. I just got your insurance, I suppose I could up my coverage to protect my amazing sports-themed gnome collection, but I’ve got nothing to switch.

In the same vein, my wife and I have a credit card with an airline rewards program. We’ve had this card for quite a while now and use it fastidiously for frequent flier furlongs (1/8 of a mile if you are scoring at home). The rub however is at least twice a month I get fancy mail pieces offering a free checked bag if I get the credit card that I already have along with a couple of emails with the same offer. And the emails link to the website where I often purchase plane tickets with this same credit card in question. Actually, if I combined the mail pieces with printed copies of the emails I get with the same offer, I’d have enough paper to fill my free checked bag.

I’d assume that a large insurance company and a major credit card company and airline would leverage some of the most powerful tools in the technology world to ensure they wouldn’t make the mistake of sending me offers for products I already have. Turns out they don’t. Instead, they could save a few bucks by doing a duplicate elimination between their customer databases and the prospects they are trying to target. It would cost them a heck of a lot less money to clean their customers from a prospect list than it costs in printing and postage in an attempt to convert people already using their products and services.

It’s often the simple things to eliminate waste and create good interactions with clients and prospects that make the biggest impact. While it is super-cool and really useful to be able to drill down on your business data with Google Maps, it’s probably more valuable to be able to identify those who are already using your service—then ensure you are talking with them in a way they prefer and are more receptive. You need technology to accomplish those things, but it doesn’t have to be bleeding edge. Make sure you are getting the easy stuff right, and then move on to the cool toys.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to my underground lair to invent a cat with laser beam whiskers.

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All Things Trivial Are Not What They Seem

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

5:45 AM 1/27/2010

The Wife says, “Are you awake?”
My reply was a relatively unintelligible, “mmmhrmph.”
“Ed Begley Jr.,” she forces out with a tired sigh.
I reply with a surprised, “Oh!”
The Wife then says, “zzzzzzz.”
And I offer back, “zzzzzz.”

For most people this conversation wouldn’t occur, or would be so out of context that one would assume it’s a bizarre dream that shouldn’t be discussed with the world. But for us, it is Trivia Week and something as simple as “who the heck was the guy from that commercial Monday night?” takes on significant meaning. This Friday, The Wife and I will pack our bags and head down to sunny Kaukauna, WI (it would be warmer if that was an HI) for Lawrence University’s Great Midwest Trivia Contest, where we, along with hundreds of other fools, will attempt to correctly answer a question every three minutes for fifty straight hours. If I’ve learned anything from the Googlefest that is Trivia, no matter how you attempt to present your information on the Wide Wide World of Web, people aren’t going to find you if you haven’t made an effort to be found. In other words, it isn’t just a matter of differentiating your web presence from your competition: you need to make yourself available to be found.

My trivia team is ready to go. We have enough technology to make Skynet jealous. Our team includes lawyers, professors, and technical folks that have spent years working with or for Apple, Microsoft and IBM. Our 40 person team comes from all over the country and all over the globe. We could actually make a pretty cool deck of cards from all the different driver’s licenses! We eat better than at Thanksgiving or Christmas. We have a bank of phones that would make a call center jealous. We will be blogging and tweeting throughout. And we will win. Again. Our team captain John Brogan described us as the New York Yankees of trivia. While I bristled at that description, he’s right. We are going for 10 straight years of winning the off-campus division.

I was roped into this study in sleep deprivation four years ago by The Wife. My addition to the team has been described (to stick with the baseball metaphor) like picking up a veteran left-handed bat for the pennant run – the type of player described as a “professional hitter.” Sure my knees are shot and I can’t run anymore, but I keep focused and provide some important hits in the clutch. For example, in the final stages of the contest two years ago, I managed to find Jim Morrison’s passport number.

What I’ve learned over the last four years is that one can’t possibly anticipate all the different methods people will use to try and find something on the internet. I am not a Search Engine Optimization expert, nor will I pretend to be. But when you put an American, a Brit, a Canadian and a Texan next to each other and have them search for the same information—they are all going to go about it in a different way. Any business needs to keep this in mind when developing a web presence. It isn’t just about throwing up some XHTML, pretty pictures and a description of what you do. You need to think about how you reach your customers and how they can find you. While it might seem to be a lot easier than hoping someone’s fingers walk to you in the Yellow Pages, it is actually a lot more challenging. It’s not just about differentiating yourself; it’s about developing a strategy to help people find you. I’ve thought for several years now that Google, Yahoo or Bing could learn a lot about their search engines by analyzing the search data from the Great Midwest Trivia Contest.

If you are curious, or just a masochist, you can follow all fifty hours of the Great Midwest Trivia Contest and listen online at WLFM Radio. Just make sure to root for the Bank of Kaukauna as we go for ten titles in a row!

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On Demand Pineapple

Monday, January 18th, 2010

We’ve been throwing out lots of words around the office lately: Distributed Computing, Software as a Service (SaaS), Pineapple, Cloud Computing, On Demand. To many people, those are just words. They float around with little bits of meaning, but they are not really concrete ideas associated with a current technology environment. Most people want to turn on their computer, generate emails and spreadsheets, check Facebook and have everything work. We don’t really want to think about what’s behind the scenes. So when a company like mine releases an on demand direct mail solution called A-Qua Mailer, many people are just hearing words and not getting the point of how cool this A-Qua Mailer “thingy” really is.

Let’s try to demystify the concept of cloud computing. If I suggested that you close your eyes and imagine for a second, it probably won’t be good for productivity, so keep them open and pretend that you run a small business. We will call it I Need Pants, Inc. and you provide Pant Solutions to a myriad of verticals in the bodily attire market (wait a minute, I think I just delved too heavily into marketing speak). So you make pants and every time a customer orders pants you put them in a box, and send them off for delivery. It doesn’t matter if your customer is down the road or across the country. Maybe you have ten deliveries a day, maybe a hundred, but you have a fleet of drivers to deliver each package. That seems pretty silly, doesn’t it? A driver and a vehicle for each package? Do you have any idea how much it costs to park a car in downtown Minneapolis? In reality you’d call UPS and a dude in brown shorts and socks (even in winter, this is Minnesota) will come pick up all your packages, and your products will “automagically” arrive at your customer’s location. Pretty cool, right?

Scenario one is a simplistic explanation of what actually happens in a typical IT infrastructure. At the enterprise level, a different server controls each function of the business. Maybe one runs your CRM, another controls your invoicing system, a third ensures you have email, a fourth gives you access to the interwebs, and server five controls inventory, and so on and so forth. It’s like having a fleet of cars and a bunch of grizzled mechanics trying to keep them on the highway so you can deliver each box of pants separately. It’s not efficient and it’s not cheap. And if you’ve ever been in an overcrowded data center, you know it is hot enough to bake fresh cookies.

Internally we use a UPS driver to power our CRM. Actually, we use a pretty cool SaaS solution called SugarCRM. SugarCRM gives us all the flexibility of having an in-house CRM tool, without having to pay for all the equipment and maintenance needed to implement and run it ourselves. Our IT team is busy enough and this keeps them from getting too cranky. The best part for us, is that we actually only pay for what we use. We don’t have to pay for software to maintain, and we don’t pay a king’s ransom for an enterprise license. Instead, every time we add a sales rep we add an additional user (or seat) license to access the application. We don’t have those large infrastructure and deployment costs associated with housing the application in our datacenter. To use the metaphor, I want to pay to ship each box of pants, instead of paying for the potential need to ship pants. Having our CRM application in the cloud and hosted by the vendor and available on demand allows us to do just that.

To bring this to a desktop comparison, Gmail and other email applications are the perfect examples of services that replace desktop software much like Lorton Data’s A-Qua Mailer does for mailing applications. Outlook is a great email client for work, especially when you have someone else in charge of making it work for you. If you used it at home for personal email, it would be a pain to get it initially set up and then you’d only be able to check it on that machine. Unless you wanted to install Outlook on other computers, or constantly change settings when you are on a new PC, Outlook isn’t really convenient for personal e-mail. It is much easier to start up Firefox or Internet Explorer, head to the website of your email service and log in. No additional software required. No obnoxious updates that try to reboot your system when you are in the middle of something. All the maintenance is done for you by the service provider. Using a third-party provider like Gmail (or UPS in my earlier example) allows for both increased efficiency and ease of access.

Our A-Qua Mailer provides the same ease of use. As long as you have a formatted file and a web browser, you can get your mailing list processed for the deepest levels of USPS discounting available to you. Without having to buy software, or update it, or make sure you have the latest and greatest USPS requirements up to date on the system or pay for modules you don’t use because some day you might. Instead we take care of all that for you. All you do is pay for your processing. And that is pretty cool.

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Data Story Time

Thursday, December 10th, 2009

Every Wednesday night for the last fourteen weeks, I’ve had the pleasure of sitting through the academic equivalent of a giant bowl of beets. Before going after a Master’s degree in MIS, I needed to take a prerequisite course in financial accounting. The class has been fantastic for fleshing out my deep transactional understating of business. Financial accounting brings to mind old-time images of guys with adding machines and visors; the reality is this course should have been called “Storytelling from an Economic Perspective.” That’s all numbers really do, provide information to help tell a story. I think we get too caught up in presenting the numbers and forget to talk about what the numbers really mean.

While I am not going to present myself as a business intelligence expert, I did spend two years doing sales operations data analysis and translating between the sales organization, finance and IT departments to get projects completed reasonably on time. This means taking data that has no context and making it actionable. It means geeking out by using the same application I use to make grocery lists. It means being mocked by my family and friends. It means Excel.

I’d like to offer some key points about data analysis and presentation from my experiences that might be useful. As always, your mileage may vary.

1. Numbers tell a story, they aren’t the story.
Nate Silver’s Five Thirty Eight is a fantastic illustration on how to tell a story from the numbers. Nate is a stat-head, but he’s able to translate that information into a story or argument which makes sense for anyone, regardless of their background. The primary purpose of generating data in a number format is to help provide evidence for an opinion. Think back to the last time you had a writing or speech assignment in school and they talked about supporting evidence. Keep that in mind any time you are presenting information that involves numbers.

2. GED – Good Enough Data
This is a concept people have a difficult time getting their arms around, but I found it has been very important for getting things done.  Your information doesn’t have to be 100% accurate all the time.  For example, if you are trying to illustrate to a team of sales reps that gross margin is low and they need to be negotiating better, you don’t have to pull every transaction for the last six years and spend hours slicing and dicing it.  Get close to the pin to illustrate your point.  You aren’t preparing a report for the SEC, so don’t spend more time creating a report than time your audience spends using it.  It doesn’t make sense.

3. Customize for your audience
Seriously, one spreadsheet does not fit all. The chart you make for sales should be different than the one for operations or finance. It’s just like public speaking; extract the data that illustrates your point and makes sense for your audience. Kick out the extraneous stuff that you’ll want to explain, but won’t make sense for your crowd. It is just boring and will confuse your point.

4. Make the information actionable
Summary information should also contain (on another tab) the line item detail that proves your point. Do this not so you can win an argument, even though that is fun, but so that after the presentation people can take your data and do something with it. I know that sounds like crazy talk, but the point of this stuff is to reach a goal. Most meetings aren’t FYI–although one might argue that a lot of them feel that way—they are to get a team together to go somewhere. Make it easy for them.

5. Bite sized chunks
If your data fields stretch out to column AA, it might be just a hair too much. If it stretches to column AZ – delete it. Immediately. It isn’t useful to me, you, or anyone who looks at it. Information overload makes it really easy to be dismissed. If it’s dismissed due to complexity, you’ve killed the whole actionable idea. If it takes hours to figure out what you’ve done, then you are wasting people’s time.

6. Data expires quickly
Any data extract is a point in time. This is especially important to remember for transactional or customer information. Tell your audience what that point in time is and try to keep it reasonably close to the point of presentation. If it takes weeks to massage and tweak your data, it’s probably going to be too old to still be reasonably actionable.

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A Clean Database is a Happy Customer

Monday, November 16th, 2009

Regardless of how you are contacting your customers, you have to have a clean database!  Huzzah!  It feels good to get that off my chest.  Today, a lot of legacy systems (and their legacy data) are interconnected in a loosely fit collective of databases and the customer/donor /constituent/friend information is probably incomplete or out of date.  I want to share a story that illustrates the importance of updating your customer information.

My large car insurance company scared the absolute dickens out of me about a month ago.  You see I had a three month period, after the (now) wife got me to capitulate and move from the “Best Location in the Nation”* to the Twin Cities, where I didn’t have a real home.  My apartment lease was up, but it wasn’t time to flee the Cleve.  I crashed with some friends, and changed my billing address to my parent’s house before I forwarded it to Minnesota.  Since I pay my bills online, this seemed like the easiest solution while I was living a Boxcar Willie lifestyle.

How did they scare me?  I received a call from my dad, “your insurance company just sent you some mail to our house with a time sensitive stamp on the front, and we’ll send it out to you now.”  I handle everything on line, so I was a little concerned.  I have a squeaky clean driving record, until this post goes live and that is jinxed, so I wondered what in the world they wanted and why it didn’t come to my current address.

Two days later, I opened the letter.  “WHY DID YOU CANCEL YOUR POLICY, YOU ARE AN IGNORANT FOOL TO GO TO ANOTHER INSURANCE COMPANY!”  Okay, that’s probably not what was written, but it is what I read.  I thought, “Holy Crow! They canceled my policy, or I forgot to pay my bill, or someone used my personal information in an accident and I am being booted and may have to defend myself from a life in jail when the police catch me.”  I was just a hair frantic.  I ran to my computer, which was off because I just got home from work.  Fifteen minutes later, after every company who had a hand in making a component to my PC and some companies who even just thought about it, had announced they were in working order, I launched Firefox and logged into my account.  Everything was fine.  My policy had not been canceled.  Whew!

After my outrage had subsided, I thought about what just happened.  Clearly my insurance friends had a database of lapsed customers that did not properly communicate with their current policy holders list.  Apparently, my few months of getting mail at the parent’s house ended up getting me on the lapse list and nearly put me on another lapsed list again when I expired from the stress.  This company has my name, date of birth, vehicle registration number, knows if my eyes change color on a Thursday, my social security number, what pants I am wearing and a myriad of other personal information that would allow them to match my Cleveland residence with my Minnesota residence.  But they could not pull that off.  My guess is they have multiple databases but no way to tie the pertinent information together to really know and understand who their customers are.

It is rare that I am going to directly hustle our services on the Lorton Data Blog.  The Social [Media] contract tells us it isn’t really appropriate, but in this instance to disguise my pitch as a marketing help or discussion would feel a tad false.  So here it goes:

While, this was specifically a direct mail experience, the problem isn’t unique to direct mail.  If you want to contact your customers in any way, it is essential to have a clean list before you contact them.  Phone, email, address, really anything you want to use when you talk to them should be scrubbed.  Be prepared to know your customers.  They like that kind of thing.  This doesn’t just mean bouncing your file against the National Change of Address Database.  This means pulling the data from your CRM, and your invoicing tool, your leads spreadsheet that is still in Excel 95 and getting them matched, consolidated and processed for updated information.  I can absolutely help you with that.  In full disclosure, it won’t be me personally, but we have some people that are absolute experts at this stuff.  Email me and we’ll get you sorted out before you begin your campaign.  You can save money, increase revenue, or if you play your cards right, you’ll do both!

I’ve run a little long today, so in the near future I’ll talk about another campaign where marketing from a transaction database gave up the ghost and how the program failed to generate the level of revenue expected.

*Cleveland, Ohio!

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